ChefUptothePlate

Food, Nutrition and Cooking

From Russia with love

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This is my first post since I’ve returned  from a trip to Russia. One of my very favorite parts of traveling is enjoying the local food. My son lives in Russia and introduced us to many Russian specialties as well as regional Georgian food, all of which was delicious. My favorite Georgian dish, I offer you here. Khinkali is akin to a large wonton, although that comparison is just to give you an idea what you will have prepared. 

KHINKALI

3.75 ounces of ground meat (preferably pork or beef, although turkey can be used as well)

3 onions, minced

1 lb. + 1/8 cup flour

salt and pepper to taste

1.5 cups warm water

Large pot of boiling salted water

 

Mix meat and onions. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Add about 4 ounces warm water and mix thorougly. Set aside. (mixture will be wet).

Sift flour, pile it up and make a hole in the middle. Pour about 8 oz water  and a 1/2 tsp salt to flour and knead the dough until well combined. Add more flour as needed to make a smooth dough that is not too sticky. Roll out the dough until about 1/4″ thick and cut out rounds with a cookie cutter, then roll out each circle until each is about 4-5″ in diameter. Divide meat mixture so that there is an even amount for each circle (about a spoonful for each). Gather the edges of the dough up and twist the top so it forms a “beggar’s purse” shape. Drop Khinkali into boiling salted water, twisted side down. They will drop to the bottom of the pot and then rise up. Shake the pot gently to prevent sticking (do not stir because stirring might break the khinkali). Boil for about 15-20 minutes in total, spoon from pot carefully and serve hot. 

As it cooks, the Khinkali absorbs the salted water so that you twist off the top, drink the “broth” and then eat the remainder of the Khinkali. 

 

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Author: ssleedsrd1843

Sari Schlussel-Leeds, MS, RD, CDN is a Registered Dietitian who loves to cook and to eat! Her love of both naturally led to a career in nutrition. After years practicing clinical nutrition, Sari now focuses on Nutrition Education. Sari’s limits her private practice to the counseling of adults specializing in medical nutrition therapy. With “moderation” as her mantra, Sari knows that no matter what the condition, eating needs to be pleasurable. Her blog, www.chefuptotheplate.wordpress.com, is a forum reflecting that mantra with healthful and delicious foods as well as tips for a healthy lifestyle. All content of www.chefuptotheplate.wordpress.com is the intellectual property of Sari Schlussel-Leeds, MS, RDN, CDN

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